How to Become a Home Inspector

Are you interested in how to become a home inspector? It can be amazing and rewarding career. First, make sure this career is right for you. Home inspectors are hired to inspect and report the condition of homes, making sure a home is up to code and free of defects. You will definitely need extensive knowledge in areas such as electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling and roofing. You will also need good communication skills; to be able to explain clearly the conditions observed in their importance. Chances are, this will be your own small business, so business management and business skills are very important.

The next step you need to take to become a home inspector is to locate an accredited school to take your licensing courses. There are many associations and companies that offer home inspector training. One of the best options is through an online school; you can usually finish much faster than in a classroom setting and take the courses from the comfort of your own home.

Once you complete your home inspection licensing courses and pass your exam, you are ready to go. Membership in home inspection associations are great benefits to inspectors; to join, you will have to meet certain requirements and adhere to the “Standards of Practice’ of the organization. Membership in these types of organizations will also benefit you as consumers are looking for inspectors who are members of reputable associations. These associations will also help keep you up-to-date on your continuing education. Home inspection continuing education is essential in running a successful business as it will allow you to advance your knowledge and keep you in tune with the current state of the market.

To become a home inspector, you definitely need to be a well-rounded individual with knowledge in the housing industry, as well as business skills. With hard work and dedication, you can enjoy a career as a successful home inspector and know that you are making a difference in helping out your community.

Why Home Inspectors Are Struggling and What To Do About It!

There’s over 22,000 real estate inspectors in United States alone. A number big enough to stay quite competitive.

There’s residential, commercial, thermal, mold, termite and pest inspections available nationwide. Often times, it’s difficult to stand out as a business and more importantly grab the attention of the people who need you the most.

The truth is blunt, if you’re not experimenting different marketing avenues then you’re missing out on giant opportunities to interact with your customers.

For the most part, the age group of home inspectors is above 40 years of age.

This has hindered the industry in profits (aside from the 2008 real estate meltdown) and made the everyday job much harder.

Do you know the average income of a home inspector in a rural area?

Its approximately $60,000-$70,000 per year, gross.

Why is it low?

Homes are getting sold left and right, real estate agents are profiting and a fairly low percentage of inspectors are cashing out on the overflowing amount of referrals.

Are they the best of the best?

Not really, in fact they are different in a completely opposite aspect.

They adapt to change

Business cards, networking meetings, flyers, referrals, pro-bono work and phone book directories still work.

Just not as good as the more mainstream sources which today’s consumers are much more aware of. The sources today are different, cheaper and fast. Online advertising can be ultra effective when reaching the right target audience with the right message.

A quick guide for you to remember is: Your service is step 1 (the easiest part of your business).

Your guarantee is step #2, make your service risk free!

Your ability to appeal to the target market by connecting with them on a emotional level (addressing their problem and offering your solution because it’s truly the best answer for them). Before I dig deeper, I want to point out some really important sources to build your online presence for your business.

Facebook groups (specific niche related groups). LinkedIn organizations.

Related nline forums.

The list get’s a lot longer, but those are simply the best.

Make a name for yourself and become the professional many brag about. (Do this enough, you’ll grab attention!) Don’t be a crook and do everything for the money.

One of the best things you can do for other inspectors, prospective customers and people standing by is offering free information about what you do, how things work and why they work. Any objections they have about you, your service or inspections in general should be answered immediately and clearly!

Moving into more online marketing sources such as pay per click campaigns and organic ranking is much more than getting people to visit.

As you already know, getting clients to your website is the easy part.

However, getting the visitors to convert and give you a call which takes the most time to master. Dedicate more time to being able to convert your webpage for calls and you’ll pull out on top. Note: Read some books on advertising and copywriting.

If you had bad experiences with real estate agents and almost never get referrals, than it’s not your fault.

You probably already know, real estate agents most of the time get the inspector that’s “ideal” for them.

One that most of the time, will pass an inspection and does a good job.

What’s really important for them is the commission they will receive when a property transaction goes through.

If you interfere with that transaction by finding something that needs to be fixed and it causes a delay or even a cancellation, then they will not recommend you again.

It’s that simple.

Luckily, the sources mentioned above are great places to dig really deep!

I hope this helped you to get started.

Inspecting a Home Inspector – What Should You Expect in a Home Inspector

You’ve decided you need a home inspector because you’re either buying a home or selling one, and you want to do it right. Out of curiosity you sit down at the computer and do a Google search to see what qualifications a good home inspector should have, and you get a little scared.

The first thing you see is a group of ads for home inspection courses. You’ve heard of people buying bogus college degrees online, but can Joe Anybody become a home inspector the same way? The image of a TV commercial comes to mind. You know, the one where the doctor is on the phone talking a guy through an operation. No thanks!

So, how do you find a truly qualified home inspector? The first thing to try is to ask trusted friends or business acquaintances for their recommendations. Sometimes there’s nothing better than a good “word of mouth” lead. Requirements vary from state to state and place to place, so you need to find a good local inspector. Save the bulk of your computer research for checking out the names you’ve been given.

You need an inspector who literally knows houses inside and out and is thoroughly acquainted with state, county, and city regulations. Start asking questions. Interview each prospective home inspector. Let him inform you by describing the inspections he does and why he thinks you should choose him. Here’s a list of possible questions you could ask.

* Is he certified by the proper state, county, or city agencies? What license number does he have? His license number is a great way to know how long he has been in business. The lower the license number, the longer he has been in business. Check to see if he displays his license number on his website.

* What trade associations does he or she belong to and what certificates does he or she have? (For instance, the American Society of Home Inspectors is an excellent organization. There are organizations in each state as well.)

* What’s his educational background? Does he keep up to date with the changes in the industry?

* How many years of experience does he have inspecting homes, and how many has he inspected?

* Does he have a background as a contractor or engineer? (It’s not necessary for an inspector to have an engineering degree or to have been a contractor for twenty years, but the principles learned from such education and experience are valuable.)

* Is he a full time inspector?

* May you accompany him when he does the inspection? (This is typically recommended, but you must not hinder or distract the inspector. You should not get near any open electric areas or get on the roof with him due to safety concerns.)

* How long will the inspection take? (The average is one hour per thousand square feet, but this can vary depending on the house and those who are present.)

* Does the inspector get on roofs when possible? Does he get in crawlspaces when they’re accessible?

* What kind of report will you receive, and when will you receive it? (Most home inspection companies offer onsite reports. Many will provide a preventive maintenance manual as well.)

Here are a couple more guidelines to consider. You should shy away from inspectors who criticize their competition. Don’t go with the lowest price. Go with the one with the best qualifications.

Incidentally, the cost of inspection services is highly variable. It depends on the level of experience of the inspector and the level of services provided. Cost is also determined in part by the size and value of the property inspected. An inspection of an eight thousand square foot home will cost more than one for a two thousand square foot home.

The inspector you’re looking for needs to have an understanding of basic construction practices and mechanical systems. He should understand how buildings are constructed and how the systems work. A good inspector will have a talent for making observations which provide indications of problems or potential problems. This talent comes from years of experience in inspecting homes.

Of course, the inspector must have the skills necessary to issue the inspection report. After all, that’s what you’re hiring him to do for you.